EOS International Company Blog

Great website design tips for libraries

The benefits of a Web presence for libraries cannot be stressed enough, especially if our institutions want to stay relevant with growing, increasingly Internet-driven and younger demographics.

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News roundup: Stories you may have missed in October

Fall is well underway, but Halloween wasn’t the only major event happening for libraries across the country last month. There are many things on the horizon for libraries, and a good portion of these advancements occurred last month. However, there were some glimpses into the history of libraries that were also of cultural significance that occurred in October.

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A history of libraries and banned books

Banned Books Week recently passed, which gave librarians and patrons alike a chance to re-examine the milestones that our country has seen in book censorship. Many pieces of literature have been challenged over the years, but one thing is for certain: libraries have always been at the forefront of allowing patrons the freedom to choose what they wish to read.

According to the American Library Association, even if the viewpoints expressed in the material are “unorthodox or unpopular,” readers should ultimately have the choice and opportunity to read whatever book they choose. This has been a major source of controversy for some time, and continues to dominate headlines today.

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Using data analytics to measure academic library worth

Knowing what is the most beneficial to your patrons and measuring the valuable work of libraries has traditionally fallen into two major categories: circulation data (also known as circ count) and gate counts. Traditionally, bookkeeping was the norm for these types of records. However, using data analysis has become the gold standard for 21st century libraries with software, which has become quite advanced over the years.

The use of this information in a proactive manner is “what it really means to be a data-driven organization” Sarah Tudesco, an assessment librarian at Yale University, explained in Library Journal’s “What is a Data-Driven Academic Library?” Tudesco went on to state that instead of asking open-ended questions during library meetings, such as “is our library meeting the needs of our community now, and will it in five years?,” a centralized data strategy is needed for libraries to prove their worth in the digital age.

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Why going green can benefit libraries

Green efforts have reached a tipping point in libraries, especially in the past five to 10 years. While many industries have made serious efforts to “greenify” their buildings and reduce their carbon footprints, libraries have been at the forefront of making significant changes to ensure they are doing their best to respect the environment.

However, even though the altruistic reasons behind green libraries are enough of a motivating factor on their own, there are financial and social benefits to going green as well. Across the U.S., there has been a groundswell for this movement both in academic and public settings. Although there is limited information on the impact of green libraries in the long-term, the benefits of libraries following ecologically responsible practices continue to grow year after year.

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Google vs. library databases: Which is better for research?

Google is everywhere – from TV ads to news broadcasts to mobile phones. As popular as it is – is it the most reliable resource for student research? Many academic thought leaders say no. While Google has undoubtedly shaped the way we operate in an online environment, many leading experts agree that it might not be the catch-all domain when it comes to complete and thorough data collecting.

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Public libraries are beating out Amazon as a marketing vehicle

Many librarians think that e-books are the future, and according to a recent Wall Street Journal editorial, it appears that all signs are pointing in this direction.

For decades, a duel of “libraries vs. the machine” might have been a more apt title for the relationship between software and libraries. However, it appears that many public institutions are using technological advancements in their favor and even beating out tech industry giants in the process – namely, Amazon.

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How libraries can understand and measure ROI

In an environment that’s constantly evolving like libraries, measuring the return on investment can be difficult to determine. However, many libraries are utilizing tools to better understand and measure ROI for several reasons.

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Top 10 challenges for academic libraries in the 21st century

It’s clear that the library has been a valuable institution for academic purposes as long as pen has been put to paper. However, the library and its role in academic research is no doubt going through a clear transformation in the 21st century.

Libraries have long been endless sources of information for students – for centuries this involved row after row of books. However, the face of libraries is changing as content is moving toward a digital platform and Internet access is becoming more of a human necessity than a privilege.

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The Illusions of Google Finding Quality Authoritative Results

By Adrian Watkins, Market Analyst, EOS International

The term “I’ll Google it” has become ubiquitous with everyday life.  It’s the answer to some of our most prevalent questions: where to eat, where to go on vacation, what car to drive?  This has created an illusion.  For example have you ever been given a shirt that says one size fits all?  Yes it is a shirt and people of many sizes can wear it but it really fits few people well.  For everyone else it’s either too big or too small.  Google is exactly that – it’s seen as one size fits all.  In reality, though it is invaluable in searching for a restaurant, if you are researching a topic for your organization or school it can seriously fail you.

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